Views about PID Systems. The Training course

The objective of the training course is to inform participants about the usage of PIDs, the systems that are available and services that can be used. By the end of the course, participants will have a good overview enabling them to participate in registering and resolving PIDs for their purposes.

The training course offers both a theoretical (overviews, usage, specifications) section as well as hands-on experience. Various experts will give presentations to help participants obtain a comprehensive overview and practical insight about PIDs and PID systems allowing them to draw their own conclusions. The course will not only include presentations that indicate current usages, but will also cover possible future usages.

The training course runs from 31 August 2016 (10.00) to 1 September (12.00).

Link to the main page of the PID events.


Meeting Report

The final report on the PID training course and workshop is available here.


Draft Training Course Agenda

31. August 2016

Time

Subject

Presenter(s)

Note

10.00

Reception & Coffee

11.00

Overview of RDA Activities and Results

Beth Plale

This presentation will give an overview of the current state of RDA recommendations where PIDs are one of the most relevant topics (see Explanation A)

11.30

Usage of PIDs from a Lab Perspective

Slides

Peter Wittenburg

This presentation offers an overview about the various usages of PIDs from a Lab perspective (see Explanation B)

12.15

Usage of PIDs from a Publishing Perspective
Slides

Sünje Dallmeier-Thiessen

An overview of the various usages of PIDs from a data publishing perspective (see Explanation B)

13.00

Lunch Break (self-paid, cash only) in Max Planck IPP canteen & cafeteria

14.00

PID Centric infrastructures
Slides

Tobias Weigel, Beth Plale

An illustration of how PIDs could be used in advanced infrastructures as an opportunity to bind various aspects together (see Explanation C)

14.45

Requirements for PID Systems for Digital Objects

Slides

Tobias Weigel, Sünje Dallmeier-Tiessen, Peter Wittenburg

A summary of requirements for PID systems which follow from the previous presentations, but focus on PIDs for Digital Objects (DO) (see Explanation D)

15.30

Coffee Break

16.00

Overview about PID Systems for Digital Objects

Slides Jonathan Clark
Slides Larry Lannom

Larry Lannom, Jonathan Clark

An overview of generic PID systems which are offered, indicate its functions and in how far they meet the requirements (see Explanation E)

17.00

Characteristics of usable PID Services

Slides

Ulrich Schwardmann, Laura Rueda, Geoffrey Bilder

An introduction to some service providers that offer PID services, indicate their intentions, business models, etc. (see Explanation F)

18.00

End of Day 1

19.00

Dinner (self-paid) at Bavarian restaurant Neuwirt in Garching

 

1. September 2016

Time

Subject

Presenter(s)

(Note)

9.00

Hands-On Session on PID registration and resolution and Type Registration

Tibor Kalman, Laura Rueda

A hands-on session to show how to register PIDs with different services providers, how PIDs are anchored in MD, how PID resolution can be used, how a type can be registered, etc. (see Explanation G)

10.15

Coffee Break

 

 

10.45

Layered Services on top of PIDs

Geoffrey Bilder, Michael Lautenschlager

An indication of what kind of services can be built on top of PIDs if they include certain information. (see Explanation H)

11.30

Summary Discussion

12.00

Lunch Break (self-paid, cash only) in Max Planck IPP canteen & cafeteria

 

 

Training Explanations

A: Overview about RDA Activities and Results

This session will give an impression about the current state of RDA recommendations where PIDs are one of the most relevant topics. Different activities and results of RDA working and interested groups will be presented to give the participants an impression what they can expect from RDA in improving data sharing and re-use and how the work on PIDs is embedded in RDA activities.

B: Usage of PIDs

This session will give an overview about the various usages of PIDs in the current landscape and reflect on many relevant aspects. Many different aspects need to be addressed such as the need to identify persons, institutions, digital objects of various sorts (data, software, equipment configurations, etc.), knowledge objects (concepts, assertions, schemas, etc.) and even the millions of devices to be expected in the Internet of Things domain. Some are relying on PIDs that are associated with information about the objects for example to extract path information or control identity and integrity (like in a passport), while others use PIDs just as a unique number that is stored somewhere. Some labs are assigning PIDs and associated information already at the creation time to the millions of digital objects being created by sensors, simulations or analysis to refer to them in workflows while others want to make them (mostly collections of data or electronic publications) citable in publications. In this session we will characterize the different usages, identify overlaps and common cores and derive a few requirements for PID systems.

C: PID Centric infrastructures

This session will indicate how PIDs could be used in advanced infrastructures as an opportunity to bind various aspects together by making use of typed information associated with PIDs. Since PIDs will need to be taken care of by highly secure and persistent systems they could be seen as the secure and stable islands of information that needs to be accessible jointly such as the locations of the bit stream, the corresponding metadata, citation metadata, the rights record, etc. which also allows us to build layered services for example to find instances of the same digital objects. An international group of experts started to develop such a concrete configuration of a data fabric by combining a number of core components. The work and its implications will be explained.

D: Requirements for PID Systems for Digital Objects

This session will summarise requirements for PID systems which follow from the previous presentations, but focus on PIDs for DO. In session B different uses of PIDs were presented. In this session the focus will be on PIDs that are being used for digital objects such as data, software, equipment configurations, knowledge objects etc. since requirements for persons, institutions and projects may be different. Based on what was presented the requirements will be summarized in condensed form.

E: Overview about PID Systems for Digital Objects

This session will give an overview about generic PID systems to be assigned with digital objects which are offered, indicate its functions and in how far they meet the requirements. Different schemas and systems such as UBNs, AWKs, URIDs, Handles, DOIs, etc. have been suggested and are partly in use. The offers of these systems will be presented, their architectures and governance anchoring will be discussed and they will be analysed based on the requirements. The course is restricted to some major schemes/systems, but will also refer to some practices used in some research communities.

F: Characteristics of usable PID Services

This session will introduce some service providers that offer PID services, indicate their intentions, business models, etc. While session E will focus on schemas and architectures session F will focus on concrete service providers that offer services based on the systems presented beforehand. One of the big questions to be addressed is how for example trust in such services is being addressed by creating high global and regional redundancy to increase availability and persistence, by establishing global governance to make system survival independent of single institutions, etc. Well-known service providers are DataCite, CrossRef and EPIC.

G: Hands-On Session on PID registration and resolution and

This hands-on session is meant to show how to register PIDs with different services providers, how PIDs are anchored in MD, how PID resolution can be used, how a type to be associated with a PID can be registered, etc. The intention is that participants know about the manual steps that need to be taken to actually do things and how existing APIs can be used.

H: Layered Services on top of PIDs

This session will be used to indicate what kind of services can be built on top of PIDs if they include certain information in the PID record. If fingerprint information is being added it is for example possible to identify “unknown” locations of copies of bit streams and add the information to the PID record. If citation metadata is being added it is for example possible to create publication indexes per creator. Some ideas and existing services will be presented.