"Open innovation, open scholarship and open infrastructures – insights to the European Digital Single Market"- 10 November 2015, Brussels, Belgium

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04 Nov 2015

"Open innovation, open scholarship and open infrastructures – insights to the European Digital Single Market"- 10 November 2015, Brussels, Belgium

The meeting entitled "Open innovation, open scholarship and open infrastructures – insights to the European Digital Single Market " will be held on Tuesday, 10 November 2015 at 12:00 to 13:30 at the European Parliament and will be hosted by Henna Virkkunen, Member of European Parliamen and Catherine Stihler, Member of European Parliament.

Focused on answering a set of key questions: How can we best utilize the potential of research in the framework of the Digital Single Market, turning it into innovation, improved democracy, citizen power, growth and jobs, for the benefit of all of Europe? What roles do data, publications and research infrastructures play in enhancing European competitiveness? What are the challenges and needs? - this interactive session will provide four strategic viewpoints:

•Marlene Holzner, Communication Advisor, Cabinet of Commissioner Günther Oettinger, European Commission

•Professor John Wood CBE, FREng Secretary-General of the Association of Commonwealth Universities and Research Data Alliance Co-Chair

•Dr. Sandra Collins, Director, National Library of Ireland

•Dr. Kimmo Koski, Managing Director, CSC – IT Center for Science Ltd., Finland

 

Programme (invitation only meeting)

12:00-12:10

Opening speech

  • MEP Henna Virkkunen

12:10-12:20

Brief highlights on the DSM strategy

  • Marlene Holzner, Communication Advisor, Cabinet of Commissioner Günther Oettinger

12:20-12:35

Open data, open science, open innovation – jobs for Europe

  • Professor John Wood CBE, FREng Secretary-General of the Association of Commonwealth Universities and Research Data Alliance Co-Chai

12:35-12:50

Open scholarship – improved democracy and citizen power

  • Dr. Sandra Collins, Director, National Library of Ireland

12:50-13:05

Open infrastructures – innovation exploitation

  • Dr. Kimmo Koski, Managing Director, CSC – IT Center for Science Ltd., Finland

13:05-13:20

Discussion

 

13:20-13:30

Closing remarks

  • MEP Catherine Stihler

 

Why open science, open scholarship & open infrastructures?

 

The current global research data landscape is highly fragmented, by disciplines or by domains, from oceanography, life sciences and health, to agriculture, space and climate. When it comes to cross-disciplinary activities, the notions of "building blocks" of common data infrastructures and building specific "data bridges" are becoming accepted metaphors for approaching the data complexity and enable open data sharing. 

Open Science, Open Research & Open Innovation are all driven by the e-revolution where information is no longer defined by place, person or national boundaries. It will change the way research is done as well as generating new business models. However the largest impact will be in the speed of innovation exploitation.

The EU and several member-states have been successfully promoting “openness”– first for research publications, and now for data. But there is much more still to be done. Just as the World Wide Web has transformed our lives and economies, so this new “open” wave will matter eventually to every one of us, scientist or not. In the first instance, developing and opening the tools, systems and businesses required for this will create jobs, revenues and economic growth; the cost – growing over time to something on the order of 5 per cent of research budgets – is large but, if the market incentives are set correctly, will be shared between the private and public sector. There are significant benefits to acting now.

•Creating jobs, spurring growth - It seems obvious: Data has more value shared and used, than hidden and unused. 

•Boosting research productivity and creativity - Sharing and re-using data changes the way science is done, and who does it; that has unexpected consequences

•Helping people, engaging citizens - Citizens not only gain greater insight into what is being done in their name, but they can also look at data and suggest policy improvements.

This event is facilitated by Research Data Alliance Europe (RDA Europe), the European plug in to the global Research Data Alliance (RDA).  Launched in March 2013, RDA is an international organisation built on the volunteer and self-formed collaboration between data practitioners with a vision of openly sharing data across technologies, disciplines, and countries to address the grand challenges of society. Scientists, researchers and innovators join forces with technical experts in focused Working Groups and exploratory Interest Groups to build the social and technical bridges to enable open sharing of data on a global level. RDA has a broad, committed membership of individuals – now more than almost 3,300 from 104 countries. Membership is free and open to all on www.rd-alliance.org. The Research Data Alliance is supported by The Australian Commonwealth Government through the Australian National Data Service, the European Commission’s 7th Framework and Horizon 2020 Programmes through the different RDA Europe project phases and The National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health & Sloan Foundation, USA.