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Re: [rda-legalinterop-ig][rda_qoul_ig] New policy recommendations on open access to research data

  • Creator
    Discussion
  • #127011

    Chris Pettit
    Member

    Hi Tracey,
    I just got back from Holidays.
    Thanks for this posting. I will circulated it to others in Australia who might be interested.
    Mark Fox and I hope to present at paper which look at Open Data Maturity Model for Quality of urban Life Indicators at the 5th Plenary next month.
    Hope to catch up in San Diego.
    Regards
    Chris
    From: “Tracey.P.Lauriault”
    Date: Monday, 19 January 2015 10:58 pm
    To: “***@***.***-groups.org >> RDA/CODATA Legal Interoperability IG” , Quality of Urban Life Interest Group
    Subject: [rda-legalinterop-ig][rda_qoul_ig] New policy recommendations on open access to research data
    some of these could inform our principles and how we can inspire interoperability.
    url: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/node/10366#sthash.e5WwEQvW.dpuf
    The EU FP-7 project RECODE has released findings of its case studies in open access to research data. RECODE (Policy RECommendations for Open Access to Research Data in Europe) held its final conference last week in Athens, coinciding with publication of a short booklet summarising the project findings and the following ten over-arching recommendations:
    Develop aligned and comprehensive policies for open access to research data
    Ensure appropriate funding for open access to research data
    Develop policies and initiatives that offer researchers rewards for open access to high quality data
    Identify key stakeholders and relevant networks and foster collaborative work for a sustainable ecosystem for open access to research data
    Plan for the long-term, sustainable curation and preservation of open access data
    Develop comprehensive and collaborative technical and infrastructure solutions that afford open access to and long-term preservation of high-quality research data
    Develop technical and scientific quality standards for research data
    Require the use of harmonized open licensing frameworks
    Systematically address legal and ethical issues arising from open access to research data
    Support the transition to open research data through curriculum-development and training
    The RECODE publication offers more specific recommendations aimed at each of the key stakeholders it has targeted, namely research funders, research institutions, data managers, and publishers. The project recommendations were informed by five disciplinary case studies (physics, health, bioengineering, environment and archaeology). These drew comparisons across four “grand challenges”:
    stakeholders values and ecosystems
    legal and ethical concerns
    infrastructure and technology challenges, and
    institutional challenges
    Case studies identified two overarching issues in the mobilisation of open access to research data; firstly a “lack of a coherent open data ecosystem”, and secondly; “lack of attention to the specificity of research practice, processes and data collections”. Further details of the conference are available here, and on the project website recodeproject.eu
    – See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/node/10366#sthash.e5WwEQvW.dpuf
    The EU FP-7 project RECODE has released findings of its case studies in open access to research data. RECODE (Policy RECommendations for Open Access to Research Data in Europe) held its final conference last week in Athens, coinciding with publication of a short booklet summarising the project findings and the following ten over-arching recommendations:
    1. Develop aligned and comprehensive policies for open access to research data
    2. Ensure appropriate funding for open access to research data
    3. Develop policies and initiatives that offer researchers rewards for open access to high quality data
    4. Identify key stakeholders and relevant networks and foster collaborative work for a sustainable ecosystem for open access to research data
    5. Plan for the long-term, sustainable curation and preservation of open access data
    6. Develop comprehensive and collaborative technical and infrastructure solutions that afford open access to and long-term preservation of high-quality research data
    7. Develop technical and scientific quality standards for research data
    8. Require the use of harmonized open licensing frameworks
    9. Systematically address legal and ethical issues arising from open access to research data
    10. Support the transition to open research data through curriculum-development and training
    The RECODE publication offers more specific recommendations aimed at each of the key stakeholders it has targeted, namely research funders, research institutions, data managers, and publishers. The project recommendations were informed by five disciplinary case studies (physics, health, bioengineering, environment and archaeology). These drew comparisons across four “grand challenges”:
    * stakeholders values and ecosystems
    * legal and ethical concerns
    * infrastructure and technology challenges, and
    * institutional challenges
    Case studies identified two overarching issues in the mobilisation of open access to research data; firstly a “lack of a coherent open data ecosystem”, and secondly; “lack of attention to the specificity of research practice, processes and data collections”. Further details of the conference are available here, and on the project website recodeproject.eu
    – See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/node/10366#sthash.e5WwEQvW.dpuf
    The EU FP-7 project RECODE has released findings of its case studies in open access to research data. RECODE (Policy RECommendations for Open Access to Research Data in Europe) held its final conference last week in Athens, coinciding with publication of a short booklet summarising the project findings and the following ten over-arching recommendations:
    1. Develop aligned and comprehensive policies for open access to research data
    2. Ensure appropriate funding for open access to research data
    3. Develop policies and initiatives that offer researchers rewards for open access to high quality data
    4. Identify key stakeholders and relevant networks and foster collaborative work for a sustainable ecosystem for open access to research data
    5. Plan for the long-term, sustainable curation and preservation of open access data
    6. Develop comprehensive and collaborative technical and infrastructure solutions that afford open access to and long-term preservation of high-quality research data
    7. Develop technical and scientific quality standards for research data
    8. Require the use of harmonized open licensing frameworks
    9. Systematically address legal and ethical issues arising from open access to research data
    10. Support the transition to open research data through curriculum-development and training
    The RECODE publication offers more specific recommendations aimed at each of the key stakeholders it has targeted, namely research funders, research institutions, data managers, and publishers. The project recommendations were informed by five disciplinary case studies (physics, health, bioengineering, environment and archaeology). These drew comparisons across four “grand challenges”:
    * stakeholders values and ecosystems
    * legal and ethical concerns
    * infrastructure and technology challenges, and
    * institutional challenges
    Case studies identified two overarching issues in the mobilisation of open access to research data; firstly a “lack of a coherent open data ecosystem”, and secondly; “lack of attention to the specificity of research practice, processes and data collections”. Further details of the conference are available here, and on the project website recodeproject.eu
    – See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/node/10366#sthash.e5WwEQvW.dpufThe EU FP-7 project RECODE has released findings of its case studies in open access to research data. RECODE (Policy RECommendations for Open Access to Research Data in Europe) held its final conference last week in Athens, coinciding with publication of a short booklet summarising the project findings and the following ten over-arching recommendations:
    Develop aligned and comprehensive policies for open access to research data
    Ensure appropriate funding for open access to research data
    Develop policies and initiatives that offer researchers rewards for open access to high quality data
    Identify key stakeholders and relevant networks and foster collaborative work for a sustainable ecosystem for open access to research data
    Plan for the long-term, sustainable curation and preservation of open access data
    Develop comprehensive and collaborative technical and infrastructure solutions that afford open access to and long-term preservation of high-quality research data
    Develop technical and scientific quality standards for research data
    Require the use of harmonized open licensing frameworks
    Systematically address legal and ethical issues arising from open access to research data
    Support the transition to open research data through curriculum-development and training
    The RECODE publication offers more specific recommendations aimed at each of the key stakeholders it has targeted, namely research funders, research institutions, data managers, and publishers. The project recommendations were informed by five disciplinary case studies (physics, health, bioengineering, environment and archaeology). These drew comparisons across four “grand challenges”:
    stakeholders values and ecosystems
    legal and ethical concerns
    infrastructure and technology challenges, and
    institutional challenges
    Case studies identified two overarching issues in the mobilisation of open access to research data; firstly a “lack of a coherent open data ecosystem”, and secondly; “lack of attention to the specificity of research practice, processes and data collections”. Further details of the conference are available here, and on the project website recodeproject.eu
    – See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/node/10366#sthash.e5WwEQvW.dpuf
    The EU FP-7 project RECODE has released findings of its case studies in open access to research data. RECODE (Policy RECommendations for Open Access to Research Data in Europe) held its final conference last week in Athens, coinciding with publication of a short booklet summarising the project findings and the following ten over-arching recommendations:
    1. Develop aligned and comprehensive policies for open access to research data
    2. Ensure appropriate funding for open access to research data
    3. Develop policies and initiatives that offer researchers rewards for open access to high quality data
    4. Identify key stakeholders and relevant networks and foster collaborative work for a sustainable ecosystem for open access to research data
    5. Plan for the long-term, sustainable curation and preservation of open access data
    6. Develop comprehensive and collaborative technical and infrastructure solutions that afford open access to and long-term preservation of high-quality research data
    7. Develop technical and scientific quality standards for research data
    8. Require the use of harmonized open licensing frameworks
    9. Systematically address legal and ethical issues arising from open access to research data
    10. Support the transition to open research data through curriculum-development and training
    The RECODE publication offers more specific recommendations aimed at each of the key stakeholders it has targeted, namely research funders, research institutions, data managers, and publishers. The project recommendations were informed by five disciplinary case studies (physics, health, bioengineering, environment and archaeology). These drew comparisons across four “grand challenges”:
    * stakeholders values and ecosystems
    * legal and ethical concerns
    * infrastructure and technology challenges, and
    * institutional challenges
    Case studies identified two overarching issues in the mobilisation of open access to research data; firstly a “lack of a coherent open data ecosystem”, and secondly; “lack of attention to the specificity of research practice, processes and data collections”. Further details of the conference are available here, and on the project website recodeproject.eu
    – See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/node/10366#sthash.e5WwEQvW.dpuf
    The EU FP-7 project RECODE has released findings of its case studies in open access to research data. RECODE (Policy RECommendations for Open Access to Research Data in Europe) held its final conference last week in Athens, coinciding with publication of a short booklet summarising the project findings and the following ten over-arching recommendations:
    1. Develop aligned and comprehensive policies for open access to research data
    2. Ensure appropriate funding for open access to research data
    3. Develop policies and initiatives that offer researchers rewards for open access to high quality data
    4. Identify key stakeholders and relevant networks and foster collaborative work for a sustainable ecosystem for open access to research data
    5. Plan for the long-term, sustainable curation and preservation of open access data
    6. Develop comprehensive and collaborative technical and infrastructure solutions that afford open access to and long-term preservation of high-quality research data
    7. Develop technical and scientific quality standards for research data
    8. Require the use of harmonized open licensing frameworks
    9. Systematically address legal and ethical issues arising from open access to research data
    10. Support the transition to open research data through curriculum-development and training
    The RECODE publication offers more specific recommendations aimed at each of the key stakeholders it has targeted, namely research funders, research institutions, data managers, and publishers. The project recommendations were informed by five disciplinary case studies (physics, health, bioengineering, environment and archaeology). These drew comparisons across four “grand challenges”:
    * stakeholders values and ecosystems
    * legal and ethical concerns
    * infrastructure and technology challenges, and
    * institutional challenges
    Case studies identified two overarching issues in the mobilisation of open access to research data; firstly a “lack of a coherent open data ecosystem”, and secondly; “lack of attention to the specificity of research practice, processes and data collections”. Further details of the conference are available here, and on the project website recodeproject.eu
    – See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/node/10366#sthash.e5WwEQvW.dpuf

    Dr. Tracey P. Lauriault
    Programmable City Project
    National Institute for Regional and Spatial Analysis (NIRSA)
    NUI Maynooth
    Maynooth
    Co. Kildare
    Republic of Ireland
    Tel: 353-1-708-6146
    ***@***.***http://www.nuim.ie/progcity/

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