Historical Groups

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HG

Engagement IG

Status: 
Withdrawn
Chair (s): 

Status: Recognised & Endorsed The Engagement Interest Group is a collaborative whose purpose is to stimulate broader awareness of data openness and exchange as well as to engage researchers, curators, and other audiences in the development and implementation of RDA decisions. The group is open for participation to anyone interested in needs assessment, user studies, ethnographic approaches to knowledge and science, as well as in history of changes in epistemic cultures and forms of knowledge production and dissemination.

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HG

Long tail of research data IG

Status: 
Completed
Chair (s): 

Status: Recognised & Endorsed The aim of this Interest Group is to develop a set of good practices for managing research data archived in the university context as universities and research institutions are becoming increasingly interested in collecting and providing access to datasets produced at their institution that do not fall within the scope of other discipline-based, or government repositories.

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06 Jun 2017
HG

Make Data Count

Status: 
Not endorsed

The Make Data Count (MDC) project is funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to develop and deploy the social and technical infrastructure necessary to elevate data to a first-class research output alongside more traditional products, such as publications.

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30 Oct 2016
HG

Mapping the Landscape IG

Status: 
Completed
Secretariat Liaison: 
enquiries[at]rd-alliance.org

The Internet now connects data, compute resources and software from globally distributed resources in real time. Where on planet Earth these resources are geographically located is irrelevant, but to enable online access to them, there is a rising need for programmatic access to both data, and to software to process data across institutional, domain and national boundaries. This requires the development of standardized machine-to-machine interfaces that can loosely couple data and software through agreed formats, interfaces, vocabularies and ontologies, preferably across multiple domains. The complexity of these online infrastructures require that they are built by much wider communities, through effective cooperation and governance, to enable new and innovative forms of interdisciplinary science from globally accessible data stores. 

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