11th RDA Plenary - Industry Side Meeting "Towards a Flourishing Data Economy", 19 - 20 March 2018, Technical University Berlin, Germany

11th RDA Plenary - Industry Side Meeting "Towards a Flourishing  Data Economy", 19 - 20 March 2018, Technical University Berlin, Germany
19 Mar 2018

11th RDA Plenary - Industry Side Meeting "Towards a Flourishing Data Economy", 19 - 20 March 2018, Technical University Berlin, Germany

 

Venue: Technical University Berlin


Identifying roadblocks on our way to an efficient data economy and ways to remove them are the objective of this meeting of more than 700 data professionals from all over the world from research and industry.


"Data is transforming our economy and society, similar to the way oil reshaped the 20th century. Data Driven technologies have the potential to enhance productivity and competitiveness" (ITRE committee of the European Parliament). Increasingly more data is being generated - some experts now like to speak of a gigantic data lake to emphasise complexity, but in reality that data is heavily underused. The current roles and regulations prevent innovative re-use of data and the Economist recently expressed their concerns that the big corporate labs will consume all data without giving chances for smaller companies and entrepreneurs. Many social and technical roadblocks need to be overcome globally to create the flourishing data economy many of us are dreaming of. Therefore, this RDA Side Meeting with more than 700 international data professionals and experts from data industry is a unique place to identify such roadblocks and seek for ways to remove them.

Day 1 "Towards a Flourishing Data Economy" - Industry Side Meeting: Best Practices Day
   
09:00 - 17:00

S1: Two-day Large Data/Metadata Management Hackathon and Workshop DAY 1 (see more)
jointly led by IEEE BDGMM, RDA, CLARIN

Learn about professional data/metadata management at large scale.

The IEEE Big Data Governance and Metadata Management group (BDGMM) will run a workshop and hackathon along with the Research Data Alliance (RDA) Plenary 11. Governance and metadata management poses unique challenges with regard to the Big Data paradigm shift. It is critical to develop interoperable data infrastructure for Big Data Governance and Metadata Management that is scalable and can enable the FAIR (Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability, and Reusability) principles between datasets from various domains without worrying about data source and structure. The goal of this multidisciplinary workshop is to gather both researchers and practitioners to discuss methodological, technical and standard aspects for Big Data management. Papers describing original research on both theoretical and practical aspects of metadata for Big Data management are solicited. CLARIN offers its huge metadata space (800.000 records harvested from providers around the world).

 

Organisers/Presenters: Wo Chang (NIST, Chairman of the IEEE BDGMM group), Priyaa Thavasimani (Newcastle University, member of the IEEE BDGMM group), Dieter van Uytvanck (Technical Director CLARIN infrastructure)

   
09.00 - 12.30

S2: Machine Learning as a Core Technology, State of the Art Methods and Industry Applications (see more)
Introduction: Mikio Braun (Zalando), various industry use cases
(Open Call for other interesting industry Use Cases)

Learn about Machine Learning methodology and typical industry use cases! Ever increasing data amounts and their heterogeneity with respect to types require new methods to detect hidden patterns in aggregated data sets. Machine Learning is one of these new promising methods having the attractive characteristic of requiring only a limited amount of concrete specification, relying on the data to drive and infer the models. Leading experts will give an introduction to the basic methods and refer to software libraries that can be used. Contributions about concrete industry use cases. The session is meant to give a view about how these methods can be used and what the challenges are when using them.
Introduction: Mikio Braun (Zalando) Presentation of industry Use Cases: Volker Tresp (Siemens), Hassan Chavi (Oracle), Andreas Klug (ITyX AG), Aylin Koca (UnternehmerTUM) 1 additional slots are still available for interesting industry use cases. If you are interested to present a use case in this session, please, send an email to peter.wittenburg@mpcdf.mpg.de.

09.00 - 12.30

S3: Real-Time Data Processing as a new Challenge in Research and Industry (see more)
Introduction: Michael Scherer (TS Berlin), various use cases
(Open Call for other interesting industry Use Cases)

Learn about the challenges and solutions to work with real-time data.

When industry talks about IoT-data they often mean real-time data provided for example by sensors, industry controls or cars and real-time access to these data. Many research data are also generated by machines but most of them are usually not accessible in real-time. On the other hand, very few research and scientific institutions are prepared to provide such data including real-time access. In a conversation between a research data provider, a company representative and the audience, we want to discuss ideas for working with IoT (real-time) data. What are the obstacles and where are common interests? How can a mutually beneficial cooperation be achieved? Does IoT imply new challenges for research data and their provisioning?

Introduction: Michael Scherer (TechnologieStiftung Berlin)

Presentations of Use Cases: Christopher Rascher (tbc)

4 additional slots are still available for interesting industry use cases. If you are interested to present a use case in this session, please, send an email to peter.wittenburg@mpcdf.mpg.de.

13.30 - 14.30

S4: Presentations by the Winners of the Smart Data Solution Competition (see more)

This slot is reserved for presentations of the winners of the winners of the open competition about innovative and smart data exploitation business cases. As in the first competition we expect a number of excellent ideas. (http://ideenwettbewerb.mpcdf.mpg.de)

14.30 - 17.00

S5: Q&A Session with Distinguished Experts and Entrepreneurs about major Challenges and Opportunities to Setup Data Businesses (see more)

Meet the Experts on Major Data Challenges

In this interactive session important questions for potential entrepreneurs will be addressed. Well-known key persons will be available to give their views on the emerging data economy, give advice how to initiate a start-up and how to guide an SME to successful data businesses, and answer questions. Various issues of broader interest such as rights on data, liability conditions, usage licenses, and cross-national aspects, but also stability and availability of services, roles in the data landscape, etc. will be addressed.

Presenters:

  • tbc (Bitkom): Bitkom views and experiences
  • Wolfgang Dorst (former Bitkom): Questions about chances and risks of the data economy
  • Georg Wittenburg (Inspirient): Challenges and Opportunities for Startups
  • Nicolas Zimmer (Technologie Stiftung Berlin): How to define useful business cases
  • Mark Hahnel (Figshare): Global Research Data - Building infrastructure to defeat policy clash
  • Lenard Koschwitz (Allied for Startups)

Day 2 "Towards a Flourishing Data Economy" - Industry Side Meeting: Data Strategy Day
   
09:00 - 17:00

S1: Two-day Large Data/Metadata Management Hackathon and Workshop DAY 2 (see more)
jointly led by IEEE BDGMM, RDA, CLARIN

Learn about professional data/metadata management at large scale.

The IEEE Big Data Governance and Metadata Management group (BDGMM) will run a workshop and hackathon along with the Research Data Alliance (RDA) Plenary 11. Governance and metadata management poses unique challenges with regard to the Big Data paradigm shift. It is critical to develop interoperable data infrastructure for Big Data Governance and Metadata Management that is scalable and can enable the FAIR (Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability, and Reusability) principles between datasets from various domains without worrying about data source and structure. The goal of this multidisciplinary workshop is to gather both researchers and practitioners to discuss methodological, technical and standard aspects for Big Data management. Papers describing original research on both theoretical and practical aspects of metadata for Big Data management are solicited. CLARIN offers its huge metadata space (800.000 records harvested from providers around the world).

 

Organisers/Presenters: Wo Chang (NIST, Chairman of the IEEE BDGMM group), Priyaa Thavasimani (Newcastle University, member of the IEEE BDGMM group), Dieter van Uytvanck (Technical Director CLARIN infrastructure)

   
09.00 - 09.30

S6: Panel Data challenges and opportunities from a global perspective  (see more)

09.30 - 11.00

S7: Panel: Data Culture, Data Economy and Data Rights (see more)

Moderator: Edit Herczog, former MEP and Director Vision&Value

Panellists: Peggy Irelan (Intel), Barend Mons (BioMed), Georg Wittenburg (Inspirient), Christel Musset (ECHA)

Experts tend to agree that the culture with respect to data trading/sharing needs to change towards a domain where data is seen as any other good. This will require a clarification of the conditions (re-usage, liability, etc.) to improve data sharing. We need to understand that there needs to be a separation between data creators, brokers and users. Currently too many data creators keep their data closed and thus inhibit new services and innovation. Unclear rights situation may stimulate such a mentality. A number of questions should be discussed by this panel: How do we need to shape ownership, copyright and licenses to make the data economy working? Which type of data should be available to foster broad innovation? How can we leverage the unique strengths of the European market to build a globally competitive data economy?

11.30 - 13.00

S8: Panel: Digital Markets and Data Protection Regulations (see more)

Moderator: Sébastien Ziegler, President of IoT Forum, Director Mandat Int. Panellists: Luca Bolognini (Istituto Italiano per la Privacy), Alex Gluhak (Digital Catapult)

Along with the clarification of sharing/trading conditions we can assume that the data culture industry will change stepwise and foster the emergence of the global exchange of data and the European Digital Single Market. The European continent is following a dual evolution: on the one hand supporting the creation of an integrated European Digital Single Market, and on the other hand simultaneously substantially strengthening the privacy with the adoption of the European General Data Protection Regulation. This apparent paradox is just one example highlighting the problems we are confronted with to come to a flourishing data economy. Regulations with respect to data sharing in different countries or regions are rather diverging and it is not obvious whether this will hamper data sharing/trading or not. Establishing a global data market seems to be complex requiring at the end brokers who can deal with all the different regulations and give advice. The session will explore the consequences of the above mentioned paradox by highlighting emerging trends and approaches to conciliate these distinct but complementary sets of requirements and will put this into a global perspective. Which approach should be taken by companies to participate in the data market given the uncertainties? Is a global data market an illusion?

14.00 - 15.30

S9: Panel: Architectures, Components and Standards (see more)

Moderator: George Strawn, Chairman of the US BRDI committee, key player in the early development of the Internet

Panellists: Thomas Hahn (Siemens), Boris Otto (Ind. Data Space), Jurry de la Mar (T-Systems), Peter Wittenburg (RDA)

As long as projects or initiatives work in their own "silo" domain where strict guidelines can be enforced, data management and processing may not be optimally solved, but clear architectural choices guarantee interoperability to a certain extent. However, when data from different silos are brought together we are confronted with severe interoperability challenges and quality differences. Therefore, in industry experts are now starting to talk about a transition from the traditional approach of creating structured and unified "data warehouse" to the much more open approach of "data lakes" to meet the challenges of the emerging data domain.

The trends are clear: For discovering the richness of data and create new business cases it will increasingly be important to combine data from different sources. We can observe a few strategies to achieve both operational efficiency as well as a leading, defensible market position: 1) Some companies feel so strong and important in market sectors that they hope to be able to define "platforms" which others need to adapt to. How to design such platforms to be able to influence market sectors is not yet clear. 2) Some companies are relying on specifying generic reference architectures based on a holistic analysis of the grand problem and then follow a top down design process by stepwise concretisation down to components which are then implemented and tested. 3) Some are still waiting on making decisions by observing the high dynamics in the data domain where bottom-up mechanisms such as driven by RDA and other initiatives are playing the major driving force. A number of questions should be taken up by this panel: Which approaches should we follow to come to durable data infrastructures and save investments? Which kind of interactions do we need to make progress in increasing interoperability? Will enforced platforms be sustainable or will open best practices be the way to go? How can we learn from the many experiments and how much time do we have?

16.00 - 17.30

S10: Panel: Components, Mechanisms and Services for Interoperability (see more)

Moderator: Ana Garcia Robles, Secretary General of Big Data Value Association

Panellists: Hassan Chafi (ORACE), Hans Jörg Stotz (SAP), Larry Lannom (CNRI, RDA)

In these discussions about the most promising approaches to come to durable components of future data infrastructures we do not start from scratch. Much experience has been gained within the last decade mainly with a number of components and technologies. As example, we can refer to the wide range of semantic technologies which have been developed that yet still have a limited relevance for the daily data practices. Also we can refer to architectures around the concept of digital objects which was at the base of cloud system designs, but also resulted in clear ideas about persistently and uniquely defining identities and building a globally available resolution system. A number of questions should be taken up by this panel: Which components/technologies are unmissable and have a potential for broad uptake? What is missing for some of these components/technologies hampering their uptake in industry practices? What needs to be done to make them being accepted and thus ensure investments?

 

 

Advisory Board

Wolfgang Dorst (former Bitkom), Ana Garcia-Robles (BVDA Brussels), Thomas Hahn (Siemens), Mark Hahnel (Figshare), Hassan Chafi (Oracle), Edit Herczog (V&V), Sebastian Herden (T-Systems), Peggy Irelan (Intel), Jens Jäger (FZ Jülich), Annette Kleffel (TS Berlin), Daniel Krupka (GI), Nuria de Lama Sanchez (Atos), Larry Lannom (CNRI), Dominique Lis (ISST Dortmund), Wolfgang Marquardt (FZ Jülich), Johannes Müller (Corelaid), Milan Petkovic (Philips), Heinrich Pettenpohl (ISST Dortmund), Raphael Ritz (MPCDF Garching), August Wilhelm Scheer (Scheer Holding), Michael. Scherer (TS Berlin), Hans Jörg Stotz (SAP), George Strawn (Acad. Science US), Jack Thoms (DFKI Berlin), Matthias Weber (Bitkom), Doris Wedlich (KIT Karlsruhe), Georg Wittenburg (Inspirient), Peter Wittenburg (MPCDF Garching), Sébastien Ziegler (Mandat Int.), Andre Zwanziger (T-Systems)